p.364 Tim Walker and Tiffany Branscombe

TASK 3   –   IT’S ALL ABOUT LOVE

 

STEP 1   –   CHOOSE AN ASSIGNMENT FROM THE MAKING WORKSHOP

ORIGINAL RESPONSE 

 

STEP 2   –   COMPLETE ASSIGNMENT AGAIN USING A DIFFERENT MEDIUM

 

CRITICAL RATIONALE  

My initial response focused on my love for music and more specifically, playing musical instruments. I love the intricate details of both the physicality of the instrument and in playing them. Therefore, in my second response, I chose to represent music with a video as this shows off the intricate details of the finger placements and also the effect of these movements; the sound produced. The video starts with the focus on the feet of the players as I wanted to capture the full effect of music around the whole body. When someone truly feels the music that they love, they can not help but dance or move to it. This also gives an insight into the places not normally looked at during a musical performance, making the video more interesting and pushing the viewer to listen and feel the beat of the music. I then shifted the focus onto the instruments and the fast movement of the fingers that takes years to master. These players perform as a group and this collectivity is what makes the music so great. There is something so special about being a part of a group like this. I tried to portray this in my video, with the conductor helping everyone work together to create a full-bodied piece made up of so many intricate parts.

The video is presented on Youtube and on this website and thus, is likely to be viewed by individuals rather than in a group setting. This intimate viewing experience is mirrored in the video with the use of close up shots and low points of view that would not be seen if they were a part of the audience watching the performance. To keep the audience engaged, Noel Carroll explains that  ‘Movement rivets attention.’ It ‘is a hard-wired or innate perceptual tendency, one that is exploited constantly by film-makers’ (2003:28). Therefore, I made sure that even in a short video there were many different shots and viewpoints put together. Moreover, the first shot is ambiguous and gives little away about the setting of the video, keeping the audience intrigued so they continue to watch.

REFERENCES

Carroll, N. (2003) Engaging the Moving Image. New Haven: Yale University Press

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